How to stop a deadly lake outbreak

Lake Huron, Ontario, Canada — It’s a chilly February night, and hundreds of people are standing outside the gates of a detention center that was built to house them.

Outside the gates, police and firefighters are out front.

Outside, people are holding their hands up in a circle.

Outside in the rain, they’re marching toward the front lines of a battle to stop an outbreak that has sickened hundreds of inmates at the Lake Huronia jail and killed at least five.

It’s hard to hear the cries for help.

It is a nightmare for all those inside, including one woman who says she was forced to lie in a ditch with a gunshot wound to the head as she held her 4-year-old daughter.

The shooting happened about 9:30 p.m.

Tuesday outside the Lakeside detention facility.

The facility is in the town of Hinton, about 15 miles southeast of Toronto.

The inmates are being held in one of the country’s largest facilities, one of two at Lake Hurona that house the world’s largest jail population.

A man who answered the door of a neighboring apartment building in Hinton said that the residents had arrived to pick up their children from school.

They were all out front and were getting into their cars and headed toward the main gate.

The man who opened the door said that he had no idea who was in there and that they were all in a holding cell.

At the front of the jail, a group of people is making their way up a ramp to the main road to the detention facility, where they were waiting to take their children.

It is one of several jails in Ontario that are being flooded with people who have come from out of town, to escape overcrowding at other facilities.

The Ontario Provincial Police said that it has been overwhelmed with calls for help in the aftermath of the outbreak.

There are some people who are going through a phase of depression and have mental health issues, said Const.

Kevin Leiper, who heads the OPP’s Emergency Response Unit.

“We’ve got people who need our help.

There are some individuals who are mentally ill, there are some who have serious mental health concerns,” Leiper said.

Some of the calls are coming from the east, from Windsor and Windsor-Essex.

“There are people who don’t want to leave, who are coming up here to get help,” Leaper said.

“We’ve had people who just need a place to stay, but they don’t know where they’re going to get a place.”

A police officer directs traffic as they drive past a vehicle with blood stains on it outside the Lake Erie Correctional Facility in Lake Erie, Ohio, U.S., February 21, 2019.

A few blocks away, a crowd is milling around a makeshift hospital, with volunteers and residents filling beds, wiping away blood, and taking care of those who have died.

Inside the holding cell, the noise of people screaming and the pounding of a doorbell is deafening.

I feel like a zombie.

It has got to be horrible.

The last time I had nightmares was at this place, he said.

The facility has a maximum capacity of about 400 people.

On the inside, there’s nothing but beds, blankets, towels, water and food.

In a room in the holding area, an officer sits with a group and talks to them, but most of the people in the room have gone home.

The sounds of screaming and banging are muted.

The officers are in a good mood.

For the past few days, Lake Huronian inmates have been in lockdown, with a mandatory curfew in place, because the lake is getting dangerously high, with more than 200 milligrams of lead per 100 milliliters of water, a level that could lead to the deadly toxin tetanus.

Tests at the jail have shown that people with elevated levels of lead in their blood have higher rates of lung cancer, heart disease, diabetes and other health problems.

This is the first time in the history of Lake Hurons health system that we have a crisis of this magnitude, said Michael O’Connor, the chief medical officer for Ontario.

The lockdowns have been a relief for people in need of medical care, he added.

Many people are feeling overwhelmed.

There is a lot of anxiety, he told reporters.

We’re getting calls every day.

It seems like everybody is in lockdown.

There’s a lot more people here.

People who have been living in the same room for days are being moved into separate rooms.

Everyone is crying and saying, ‘We’re dying.

This is horrible.

This cannot be happening.”

Some of them are taking some pills and going to the hospital.

Some of them have been taken to a hospital for treatment.

There have been multiple hospitalizations.”

The lockdown was first announced by the Ontario Provincial Health