Collins Lake: Snow forecast for the next couple days

By Ben Klayman, USA TODAY Sports A blizzard is forecast for parts of Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama, bringing a possible snowstorm on Thursday and Friday.

The National Weather Service issued a storm watch for the Mississippi River Valley Thursday afternoon, and the storm could move to the upper Mississippi Valley Thursday night, potentially bringing heavy snow.

The storm could last until Friday morning, but the storm is expected to weaken.

In Alabama, a blizzard watch is in effect for parts to the north of the state’s Capital city Birmingham and parts to west of Birmingham.

A blustery morning could bring snow to parts of the northern parts of Alabama and to the Gulf Coast.

In Louisiana, a storm is forecast to bring heavy rain to the south of the country’s third-largest city New Orleans, and some areas are expected to see temperatures as low as 32 degrees.

The blizzard will likely bring more snow than normal on Thursday, but will likely moderate over the next day or two.

The heaviest precipitation could be in the region of a few inches.

A storm will be expected to bring winds of 50 mph and gusts of 50 to 70 mph to parts south of New Orleans.

A snowfall of 2 inches is forecast in parts of Tennessee.

A high of about 20 to 30 inches is expected in parts in New Jersey, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia.

Snow accumulations of 10 to 15 inches are expected in the Southeast, according to the National Weather System Center.

Snowfall totals are expected for the Northeast and Midwest.

Heavy snow is possible in parts west of New York City, New Jersey and northern New England, but snow is likely to slow to a trickle in the Northeast.

Snow is possible throughout much of New England and parts of Canada, including the U.S. The forecast for Wednesday night and Thursday morning: Thursday night: Heavy snow.

Snow could reach 5 to 6 inches in places.

Heavy to moderate rain is possible.

Light to moderate snow is unlikely.

Heavy rain is expected.

Heavy storms will move northward on Thursday.

Snow will fall as far south as Maine and the upper Midwest.

Highs in New England can reach into the 40s.

Snow falls in parts as far north as Massachusetts, Vermont, Rhode Island and New Hampshire.

Heavy rainfall is possible for parts from New York to Massachusetts, and heavy snowfall in parts from Rhode Island to New Hampshire and as far east as Maine.

Light snow is not expected for parts in central New England.

Snow accumulation could reach 7 to 8 inches, but there is some chance of light to moderate accumulation.

Heavy rains are possible.

Heavy thunderstorms are possible from northern New Hampshire to Vermont.

Heavy winter storms are possible for portions of the Carolinas, New England to Canada, the East Coast and parts down into the Gulf.

In New York, snow accumulation is possible from New Jersey to northern New York.

Heavy downpours are possible, but most of the downpouring will likely be in parts with moderate to heavy snow and the high temperatures expected.

A small snow event is expected from the southern parts of New Jersey into Pennsylvania and the Lower Hudson Valley.

A heavy snow event will likely occur on Wednesday afternoon in parts north of Buffalo, New York and southern parts, such as parts of western New York in the Upper Hudson Valley, and parts in the northeastern part of the Lower Great Lakes region.

A major snowfall is possible along the Northeast coast from western Pennsylvania to Connecticut.

Heavy precipitation is possible, including up to a foot in some areas.

A very large storm could bring up to 12 inches of snow to New England by Thursday night and a snowfall up to 5 feet to parts along the East and South Coast.

Heavy storm totals will be possible from southern New England into New York state.

Heavy wind gusts could be up to 50 mph.

Storms and heavy precipitation are possible across parts of southern New York up to Connecticut, as well as parts in southern New Jersey.

Snow may fall in parts south and east of the New York metropolitan area.

Heavy showers and thunderstorms will be likely in parts across New England from New Brunswick to Maine.

A large snow storm is possible to the northeast from western Massachusetts through southern Connecticut.

Snow totals could reach as high as 15 inches in parts.

A tornado watch is out for parts south in the Lower Carolinas and parts northwest of New Hampshire, including parts in western New Hampshire up to Maine and parts southward along the Upper and Lower Great lakes.

A possible tornado watch will be in effect in parts near Buffalo, Massachusetts, including portions in western Massachusetts and portions southward and eastward along parts of southeastern New Hampshire from the mouth of the Hudson River to northern Connecticut.

Storm clouds will likely move through parts of southwestern New Hampshire into the Carolina Mountains on Thursday night.

Snow can reach 2 to 3 inches in areas of New Brunswick and eastern Massachusetts, with light snowfall possible in areas up to 3 feet.

Snow amounts could reach 10 to 12 feet in parts throughout southern New

How to avoid $10,000 in tax bills from renting out an RV and car

The IRS has a new rule that would mean your home can’t be counted as a “car,” as long as it’s a “riding” vehicle.

It also says that the home is eligible for a tax break for vehicles that don’t have more than four seats and a roof.

RV renters and owners should take advantage of the new rules and consider renting out a rental vehicle if they don’t need a vehicle to be a “rental vehicle,” the IRS said in a blog post Thursday.

Owners of new vehicles must meet certain requirements, including having at least one passenger.

If they are renting out, they must pay the same federal tax rate as other rental vehicles.

Owners and renters could get a temporary exemption from the new tax rules, the IRS says.

They could also qualify for a refund.

The IRS has also issued guidance that explains how to deduct the cost of a “fixed rate” rental.

This includes things like insurance, maintenance and maintenance charges.

The IRS is still developing its rules for new vehicles.

But it has released guidance for owners of new cars and trucks to understand what it means to qualify for the exemption and how to get it.

The rule changes, which went into effect Thursday, are expected to cost taxpayers a combined $1,300 per year in federal tax bills, the Associated Press reports.

The tax break would apply to vehicles that are used primarily for personal transportation and do not have more seat or roof space.

This excludes the “rancher” RV and pickup trucks, which can’t have four or more seats and have no roof space, the AP reports.

It’s a major break for RV owners.

Under the new rule, a “private passenger vehicle” is defined as an RV with more than two seats and two or more wheels.

It can’t also have more passengers.

The Internal Revenue Service has also announced it will increase penalties for owners who fail to report their vehicle’s full cost of ownership.

The new rule will be applied retroactively to all vehicles that were registered before the end of the calendar year in which the owner applied for the benefit.

In 2016, owners of an RV that is leased to another vehicle will be subject to the new fee of $1 for each year they have not paid it, the new IRS rule says.

The federal tax credit for renters will also be reduced by 50 cents, and the exemption will be extended for two years to 2016.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Lakeland lake and Lake Jocasplay’s final dive

The last dive of Collins Lake was held in the summer of 2016, and its fate is not yet known.

The lake’s only dive, in 2012, was a “solo dive” by a group of divers in the lake.

The team went for three days, but the team reported they were in trouble and were unable to get back to the surface.

The last day of the dive was held the same day.

The divers used a special “dive bag” to get up to the water’s surface, but there were no ropes.

The only piece of equipment used was a water bag.

The dive team left the lake’s surface around 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 8, 2016.

They did not get to see the lake before they died.

The lake’s lake manager, Steve O’Brien, said the lake was open to the public from 9 a.m.-4 p.b.

The Lakeland Police Department did not return calls from ABC News.

O’Briens son-in-law, Scott, said they were very grateful to have been part of the event.

They were able to get some footage of the lake, but it was not as good as we hoped.

Scott said they did not know if they would be able to go back to Lake JOCA for a second dive.

He said he is looking forward to what they have planned.

We want to do something to commemorate the people that died on the lake in 2016.

He told ABC News, “We want the next generation of people to go out there and do something.

We want to be able go out and explore the lake and to see what’s there.”