Why the Flathead Lake trout are disappearing

By Brian LoefflerPublished May 15, 2018 7:59pmThe Flathead River is a beautiful place to fish.

But a recent study shows that as the fish population in the river has declined, so have the trout, and the lake is losing its trout as well.

According to a new study published by the Center for Biological Diversity, more than 90 percent of Flathead’s lake trout are now gone.

“The Flatheads’ trout population is the lowest in the Midwest, and a loss in fish is a loss of a whole group of fish species,” said Lisa McLean, the Center’s director of research and conservation and a professor of biological sciences at Ohio State University.

“There are more than 100 species of trout in this lake, and they’re all in decline.”

In the study, researchers tracked the fish populations over a 20-year period, measuring changes in their habitats and the numbers of the species that live there.

They found that the lake trout population dropped by almost a quarter, from 2,000 to 1,000.

McLean said the decline in lake trout has a lot to do with the rapid growth of other species that were introduced to the lake during the 20th century.

These include trout that are found only in the water, and are not considered to be part of the lake’s fish population.

“They’re not fish,” McLean said.

“They’re something that people don’t know about.”

“These fish are an indicator that the population is declining,” she said.

While it’s difficult to pinpoint exactly why trout are dying off, McLean believes it’s because of the rapid expansion of commercial fishing operations that have spread into the river system.

In 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issued an Endangered Species Act listing of the Flatheads lake trout, but they have not received the same designation as other trout species.

“It’s really unfortunate that the Flat Head River’s ecosystem is being impacted by commercial fishing,” Mclean said.

Flathead Lake, a small lake in the town of Greenfield, Ohio, is one of the smallest trout lakes in the U: less than a half-mile wide and a few miles long.

The lake is home to a diverse and diverse group of freshwater fish, including bass, carp, rainbow trout, steelhead and some trout that can only be found in the lake itself.

It’s also home to several small species of muskellunge, a freshwater fish that can grow to lengths of over five feet.

The Flat Head is a popular fishing spot for both recreational and recreational anglers, with people fishing on the water for trout from every angle, and also for other species, such as trout, bass, crappie, catfish and snook.

The Flathead also offers spectacular scenery for photographers, as it is home of the most spectacular lake trout photos in the world.

But according to McLean and her colleagues, the lake has been losing trout for years.

“This lake is probably one of our most important rivers in the country,” McLeod said.

McLane said the Flatwaters have lost almost all of the Lake Tobias and the Lake Tibbs, which is a river that runs through the town.

The lake has also lost more than 40 percent of the flathead bass, which have been largely replaced by other species in the Flatwater.

The flathead lake trout have been mostly wiped out, with the lake losing more than half of its stock, she said, while the Lake Torbias has lost less than 25 percent of its fish.

McLeod said the lake will need to find another way to maintain its population.

She said the study is the first of its kind to quantify the current population status of the fish in Flatwaters Lake and the other Flatwaters rivers.

“If you look at the Flat Waters, we’ve lost most of the trout in the Lake Tribes, but there’s a couple of small fish that live in the other lakes,” she explained.

McKelnes study also found that most of Flatwaters trout are dead or gone by the time the fish are in their prime, meaning they’re no longer able to spawn or reproduce.

“Flatwaters is one the most biologically diverse lakes in North America,” McLean said.

“We have a lot of fish that have been here since the early 1800s, and now we’re losing them.”

McLean hopes that her study will help inform the fishing community to take action.

“When you look around, you can see people catching fish all the time,” she told The Associated Press.

“There are so many people out there that need to be educating.”