When you think ‘cold’ lake salt, there is more:

The world’s largest lake salt deposit has been discovered in Jordan Lake, the first of several planned salt deposits to be opened by the European Union, which has been trying to bring more renewable energy into the region.

The European Investment Bank said in a statement that it would invest more than €500 million in the lake salt project, which is located on the Jordanian-Israeli border.

It is the first lake salt discovery in the area and will also open up further possibilities for salt mining.

“It is an exciting moment for the lake,” said the head of the Jordan-Israel water authority, Mohammad Salih.

“There is a big potential for economic activity in the future.”

A team of engineers from the Danish firm B.A.R.P.S.

S was the first to discover the lake in June, which will then be tested for corrosion and tested again in December.

The team will continue to drill the lake, but its discovery means that the salt deposit is a step closer to being opened.

“This is the most exciting thing I have seen in the history of Jordan,” said Salih, a geologist.

“We are at a stage in our development where we are talking about opening up some big areas.”

He said the lake could have the capacity of up to 100 million tonnes of salt per year, which would produce enough electricity to power 100,000 homes.

He added that the lake would be able to hold up to 8 million tonnes per year.

In the same way that the Sahara desert holds water, Jordan Lake holds salt.

“The salt is there, the water is there and the land is there,” Salih said.

“These are the three things that are going to give you a huge opportunity.”

The first of the six planned salt deposit projects is located in the north of Jordan, near Jordan River.

It will hold up a salt reservoir of up,000 tonnes per annum, or roughly enough to supply Jordan with 40% of its daily electricity needs.

The project has been estimated to generate about €1 billion in annual revenue.