How to live a life that doesn’t require you to play: 10 lessons from the Crater Lake Lodge

This article first appeared in National Geographic magazine.

The photo above is of the Craters Lake Lodge in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, home of the famous Yellowstone calving season.

You may have seen it featured in national and international media outlets.

The lodge sits on the banks of the Yellowstone River, surrounded by rolling hills, lush vegetation, and a series of cascading springs.

You can’t miss it, and you’ll be lucky if you catch a glimpse of the iconic sunset that lights up the horizon.

But what you won’t see at Crater Lakes Lodge is a pool, a swimming hole, a beach, or even a small campground.

The reason?

The water is too salty.

This is a story of the people who have been fighting to preserve the water in the Crates Lake, Yellowstone National Wildlife Refuge, a place that has been at the center of the U.S. government’s effort to protect the water supply from the impact of climate change.

The Craters Lakes Lodge was designed to be a temporary refuge to accommodate the current drought.

When it was designed in the 1950s, the refuge’s design was to be permanent and not be able to accommodate future water demands.

But that was changing.

Today, as the population of wildlife and people grows, it is becoming harder and harder for the refuge to keep up with demand for water.

As the National Park Service and the U,S.

Fish and Wildlife Service have said, the population and supply of water at Craters are declining.

As a result, the park is having to turn to temporary solutions.

The refuge’s current manager, Chris McNeil, said that if the current rate of water use continues, it may be difficult to keep the refuge open.

And he warned that this could put lives at risk.

“You can’t let this happen,” McNeil said.

“And that’s what we’ve got to do.”

As the population in Craters has declined, so has the amount of water available to keep it in operation.

The National Park Services (NPS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) have said that the Crate Lake is running low on water, and the BLM has asked people to use less water.

But in the years since the refuge was designed, water levels have dropped even further, making it more difficult for the park to keep water supplies flowing.

“There’s a big concern about the water levels, especially as the current climate change trend is expected to increase drought,” said Emily Stroud, a senior conservation officer at the National Wildlife Federation (NWF).

“It’s important that we understand how the water is being managed.”

What you need to know about water: 1.

The Refuge has only about 12,000 acres of land and is the only refuge in the park with a population of fewer than 200 animals.

The park has more than 20,000 waterfowl and more than 6,000 fish species.

Its largest natural water source is the Cradle River.

2.

The NPS has an ongoing plan to convert more than a third of the park’s water into desalinated drinking water.

This would help provide drinking water to people who live in rural areas and to people living in urban areas.

It also would help reduce the need for desalination plants and water trucks.

3.

It’s hard to imagine how the refuge would operate without a pool.

As we’ve seen, the water used by the refuge isn’t always sufficient to supply the needs of wildlife.

In the last couple of years, for example, the BLM’s annual use of water dropped by nearly 20 percent.

That’s because the Crating Lake has increased in size, and it now has to carry more water than the park could normally handle.

4.

The water in Crater lakes water is so salty that it’s hard for people to drink.

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